A writer-editor-teacher’s quote of the week #145

Man proposes and disposes. He and he alone can determine whether he is completely master of himself, that is, whether he maintains the body of his desires, daily more formidable, in a state of anarchy. Poetry teaches him to. It bears within itself the perfect compensation for the miseries we endure. It can also be an organizer, if ever, as the result of a less intimate disappointment, we contemplate taking it seriously. The time is coming when it decrees the end of money and by itself will break the bread of heaven for the earth! There will still be gatherings on the public square, and movements you never dared hope participate in. Farewell to absurd choices, the dreams of dark abyss, rivalries, the prolonged patience, the flight of seasons, the artificial order of ideas, the ramp of danger, time for everything! May you only take the trouble to practice poetry. Is it not incumbent upon us, who are already living off it, to try and impose what we hold to be our case for further inquiry?

– from the “Manifesto of Surrealism (1924)” in Manifestoes of Surrealism by André Breton, translated by Richard Seaver and Helen R. Lane.

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One thought on “A writer-editor-teacher’s quote of the week #145

  1. I, Eric DICKSON Ziegler, resemble my sister Virginia in no way. I respect your work very much, and happen to have had a close relationship with James Davis (“J.D.”) Dickson, Jr., my maternal grandfather. I don’t want money or trouble, just to help you with the branches on our family tree.

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